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Jesse is awesome and Cloud Cult was so freaking rad, Def moved up to one of my fave bands. He is so cute and I’m happy and sad he may be moving up north cause his life will improve but I’ll miss him like crazy.

fyprocessing:

ben-dror.com/the-abovemarine
Over a period of a few weeks I trained my Siamese fighting fish (betta splendens) José to jump out the water and get food off my finger. He also learnt to follow my hand as I moved it around the outside of his tank. Inspired by these interactions, the Abovemarine is a vehicle that enables José, or any other fish to roam on the land freely. This small freedom allows him to Interact with other species including humans and small animals. José is able to successfully navigate around a room, as he swims backwards (stopping the Abovemarine) before hitting obstacles.
The Abovemarine is not fish freedom. It is not a product and it is not for fish to live in (and they don’t). José and the Abovemarine engage our interest in the beauty and intelligence of these creatures. We are encouraged to ask questions that challenge our preconceived notions about fish and other living creatures. “Does the fish have intention?”, “Does the fish understand what he is doing?”, “Do fish have memories?”.
The Abovemarine moves using Omni Wheels, allowing it to travel in any direction without first having to turn. Without this mechanism, the tank would get stuck in a feedback loop, spinning in a circle every time José, who moves relative to the tank, swam left or right. José’s movement is tracked using a camera and computer vision.
While the Abovemarine was developed independently, I have since been made
aware of Ken Rinaldo’s Augmented Fish Reality (2004) and Garnet Hertz’s Cockroach Controlled Mobile Robot (2004).
@adambendror

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

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